Publications

6th of October 2017

Ancient genomes show social and reproductive behavior of early Upper Paleolithic foragers

Paleogenomics suggest that prehistoric humans formed mating networks to avoid inbreeding

A study led by an international team of scientists, including Isabelle Dupanloup Duperret, suggests that early humans might have purposely avoided mating with closely related partners. And this as early as 34,000 years ago.

To reach their conclusions, the scientists examined genetic information from the remains of anatomically modern humans who lived in Sunghir, an Upper Paleolithic site in Russia. While these people lived at the same time and were buried together, the analyses reveal that they were not closely related in genetic terms. The result was surprising, as people at that time lived in very small groups. To avoid inbreeding, as seems to be the case, they must therefore have developed complex cultural systems, such as wide social networks.

Martin Sikora, Andaine Seguin-Orlando, Vitor C. Sousa, Anders Albrechtsen, Thorfinn Korneliussen, Amy Ko, Simon Rasmussen, Isabelle Dupanloup, Philip R. Nigst, Marjolein D. Bosch, Gabriel Renaud, Morten E. Allentoft, Ashot Margaryan, Sergey V. Vasilyev, Elizaveta V. Veselovskaya, Svetlana B. Borutskaya, Thibaut Deviese, Dan Comeskey, Tom Higham, Andrea Manica, Robert Foley, David J. Meltzer, Rasmus Nielsen, Laurent Excoffier, Marta Mirazon Lahr, Ludovic Orlando, Eske Willerslev

    Science


    16th of August 2017

    Accumulation of Deleterious Mutations During Bacterial Range Expansions

    Most - if not all - species have experienced range expansion at some point of their history. But the impact of spatial expansion on genetic diversity is poorly known. Theoretical results showed that populations expanding on new territories accumulate deleterious mutations, potentially slowing down the speed of the expansion and eventually stopping it. But beneficial variants could compensate the negative effects of deleterious mutations. In this study, we used the bacterium Escherichia coli to test those predictions. We could confirm theoretical results: spatially expanding species are affected by deleterious mutations, leading to a drastic impairment of their evolutionary potential.

    Lars Bosshard1,2, Isabelle Dupanloup1,2,3, Olivier Tenaillon4, Rémy Bruggmann2,5, Martin Ackermann6,7, Stephan Peischl2,5 and Laurent Excoffier1,2

    1 CMPG, University of Berne, Switzerland

    2 Swiss Institute of Bioinformatics, Switzerland

    3 Swiss Integrative Center for Human Health SA, Switzerland

    4 INSERM, France 

    5 Interfaculty Bioinformatics Unit, University of Berne, Switzerland

    6 Institute of Biogeochemistry and Pollutant Dynamics, ETH Zürich, Switzerland

    7 Department of Environmental Microbiology, Swiss Federal Institute of Aquatic Science and Technology, Switzerland

    Genetics


    Swananda Marathe1, 2,  Muriel Jaquet3, Jean-marie Annoni1, 4 and  Lavinia Alberi1, 3*

    1 Medicine, University of Fribourg, Switzerland

    2 Brain Mind Institute, Ecole Polytechnique Fédérale de Lausanne (EPFL), Switzerland

    3 Swiss Integrative Center for Human Health, Switzerland

    4 Neurology Unit, Cantonal Hospital Fribourg, Switzerland

    Frontiers


     

    1st of July 2016

    Notch1 hallmarks fibrillary depositions in sporadic Alzheimer's disease

     

    Brai E1, Alina Raio N1, Alberi L2,3,4.

    1 Unit of Anatomy, Department of Medicine, University of Fribourg

    2 Unit of Anatomy, Department of Medicine, University of Fribourg

    3 Unit of Pathology, Department of Medicine, University of Fribourg

    4 Swiss Integrative Center for Human Health


    Acta Neuropathologica Communications, NCBI


     

    May 2017

    Body, Space, and Motion: a Perceptual Study

    Donald Glowinski1,2Sélim Yahia Coll2Naëm Baron2,  Maëva Sanchez2, Simon Schaerlaeken2, Didier Grandjean2

    1 Neuroscience of Emotion and Affective Dynamics (NEAD Lab), Faculty of Psychology and Educational Sciences, and the Swiss Center for Affective Sciences (SCAS), University of Geneva and Swiss Integrative Center for Human Health (SICHH), Fribourg Switzerland

    2 Neuroscience of Emotion and Affective Dynamics (NEAD Lab), Faculty of Psychology and Educational Sciences, and the Swiss Center for Affective Sciences (SCAS), University of Geneva Switzerland

    Human Technology